How I Wrote This 1,000-Word Post in 15 Minutes Using Evernote Dictate

How I Wrote This 1,000-Word Post in 15 Minutes Using Evernote Dictate

December 7, 2016 Content creation Small Business Marketing 1
We all get it: content is critical. It populates your web pages, gives your readers something to interact with on your blog, beefs up your social media profiles, and helps you establish yourself as an authority in your industry. But dang it’s time-consuming!
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It’s not uncommon for small business owners to spend hours each week on content creation. Even here at Proline Creative, I spend between six and 10 hours creating content every single week. And this is only for my four primary channels: Instagram, the Proline blog, LinkedIn, and Facebook.
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That said, I understand exactly how time-consuming content creation can be, and how hard it is to keep up with that when you’re a small business with limited resources and budget. Fortunately, there’s a tool that can help you out
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Today, I want to talk about how I wrote this 1000-word blog post in 15 minutes using Evernote’s dictate feature. And then I want to talk about exactly how much time this can save you and your contact creation efforts.
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Read on.

Evernote Dictate: Not a New Tool, But a Great One 

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Evernote has offered a voice dictate feature virtually since the platform was created. It’s not a new tool, but it’s one I have recently discovered for the purpose of content creation. Let me back up for moment: I have been using Evernote for years. In fact, Evernote and FreshBooks are two of the primary tools I use to run Proline.
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Evernote has been my go-to for tracking receipts, logging my hours, clipping web pages for future reference, and collecting ideas for content. Now, it’s also my go-to for drafting content.
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Here’s what I’ve been doing with the latter: when I’ ready to create a new piece of content, I open the Evernote app on my phone and create a note in one of my Evernote folders. For my purposes, it’s a folder called “writing.” From there, I name the document. I’ve found it’s easier to keep content organized when you name each voice dictation uniquely rather than trying to sort through the default Geo-located names that Evernote provides.
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Here’s an example:
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Once you’ve opened your new note, tap anywhere in the note’s body to edit. When you do that, the keyboard screen will slide up from the bottom of the app.
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When it does, press the microphone key.
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The microphone key, once pressed, emits a small “ding” noise to let you know that it’s recording. Once you hear this, start speaking normally.
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Unlike Siri or a similar voice assistant, the microphone feature does not shut off if you go silent for a moment, so you can read sources, skim notes, or move through an outline without worrying about it cutting you short.
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Once you’ve created your dictated content, click “save” at the top of the app. It’s that easy!
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Quick Tips for Using Evernote Dictate 

I’ve been using Evernote’s dictate feature for a few weeks now. It’s not a perfect system, (you’ll still need to go back to edit the content you’ve dictated to your phone), but it’s an excellent way to create a draft in half the time it would take you to type it manually. That said, here are some tips for using Evernote’s dictate feature successfully:
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  • Format as you go. The first few times I used Evernote dictate to create a piece of content, I didn’t add any line breaks, I inserted hardly any punctuation, and I didn’t stop to fix wrong words as I went. What I wound up with was a huge, impenetrable block of text that took me almost as much time to edit as it would have to create it. With this in mind, format your dictated content as you go. Each time you stop a microphone session, take a few seconds to look back at the content you just recorded, fix incorrect words, add line breaks, and format paragraphs. This will save you an enormous amount of time on the back end of the process.
  • Say your punctuation. Sound funny? It is, a little bit, but it makes your dictated content more readable. As you voice your content into Evernote, “say” your punctuation. For example, if I want a sentence to end with an exclamation point, I have to say the words “exclamation point.”
  • Allow 10 to 20 minutes for further editing. Once you’ve dictated all of your Evernote content, put it aside, and come back to it at a later date. When you do this, allow 10 to 20 minutes to edit the content. If you followed the above bullet points and formatted the content as you went, editing should go relatively quickly. Keep in mind that Evernote’s dictation system does not allow you to input links as you read, so you’ll have to go back and add these manually if you want to take advantage of the SEO boost that good link inclusion can offer.
  • Run everything through a grammar checker. If you’re going to dictate content, it pays to give it an extra once-over before you push it out to your distribution channels. I use Grammarly to do this although there are many such spelling and grammar checkers on the web.

Evernote: Saving You Time on Content Creation

While you may not want to use Evernote’s dictate feature to create your first and last draft of content, it is a fantastic tool for laying out the first draft in mere minutes. I use it regularly to craft the content for the Proline Creative blog, and I hands-down believe that it is one of the best tools I’ve discovered in 2016. That said, here’s to saving time on your content creation! Just imagine what you’ll be able to do with all the extra.

Not convinced that your dictated content cuts it? No problem. At Proline Creative, we are happy to offer editing, proofreading, and content creation services to help you develop a web content that grows your brand. Contact us today to learn more.
Ashley is the Founder of Proline Creative. Before starting Proline, she worked in educational content creation, print journalism, and as a Content Strategist and SME for two of the largest content marketing firms on the web. Today, she works with SMBs and startups to create quality online content on a one-to-one basis.

One Response

  1. khushboo says:

    It’s far better — from all aspects of business and hobby — to “own the real estate” where your website lives! That means you have total control and are not at the whims of policy changes, change in ownership, change in that company’s goals, policies, etc. Look at how Facebook has “changed the rules” over this past year! If you’re on someone else’s “real estate” you either put up with it or leave…

    As far as Evernote use, it’s very simple to draft in Evernote and then copy & paste the draft into WordPress, on your own domain, at your own hosting company. You, the website owner, remain in total control at all times.

    For those cconsidering FREE hosting someplace, or using a subdomain of another owner’s web real estate, remember that it looks very unproffessional to have your site residing on their platform… You need your own domain and it should be a “.com” not one of the other top-level domain designations.

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